Ambition part of the story where she is sleepwalking.

Ambition is defined as, having strong want or desire for more than you have. In the story “Macbeth”, ambition contributes to the devolvement of the characters. The three witches are the source of such ambition in this story. It’s almost as if they control the negative or even dark, selfish ambition of the characters Macbeth, Lady Macbeth and Banquo. Macbeth’s ambition is born by the news he receives from the three witches. They tell him that he is going to the be king. However, he doesn’t know how this is to happen. The story soon goes on to show us that his ambition will bring him to ruin. But way before he had this desire, he said that he wouldn’t considered killing the king in order to take his place. He wouldn’t even dream of it. This ambition bubbles and eventually drives him to murder. He kills  the king to do exactly what he claimed he would never do. Take his place.Lady Macbeth on the other hand, is way more corrupt and power hungry than her husband. She lets ambition drive her to encourage the final push of Duncan’s death to Macbeth. Of course Macbeth listens to her and decides to kills Duncan. Her ambition though, is not manly sourced by the doings of the witches. It’s driven by greed. She wants to become the Queen and have Mcbeath be the king. Her greed becomes stronger and she soon wants the power of being queen. Something that doesn’t belong to her. Both Lady Macbeth and Macbeth’s ambition become  tragic flaws for them both. Her want drives her to insanity. Which in turn,  becomes the cause of her demise. There is a part of the story where she is sleepwalking.  She goes to her room and sits down, looking at her hands. She is startled when she sees blood all over them. So, she tries to wash them clean by putting her hands in a water bowl. But when she pulls them back out, her hands were still stained red. Her maid walks by and sees her, assuming she’s crazy since only lady macbeth sees the blood. Right before her death, she reads the letter Macbeth had wrote her, telling her that he was to be King,  then finally, her guilt and greed  kills her.Banquo’s ambition is different from Macbeths and Lady Macbeth’s. His is slightly less selfish. His ambition does not drive him to murder unlike Macbeth. He wants his son to become king and after that he wants his son’s son to become king and so on for generations to come. He doesn’t know how he will make his ambition successful. But he does know, however, that it is definitely not worth killing for unlike Macbeth’s thinking. Later Macbeth finds out about this ambition and becomes jealous. His deep, selfish desire soon drives him to kill Banquo to stop his plan from unfolding. Macbeth, was at first,  a very respected and a very brave man. But his own selfish ambition leads him to guilt and paranoia. The first evident burst of guilt is right after Duncan’s murder when Macbeth exclaims  “One cried, ‘God bless us!’ and ‘Amen,’ the other, As they had seen me with these hangman’s hands; Listening their fear, I could not say, ‘Amen,’ when they did say ‘God bless us'” (2.2.37-40). It is very clear that Macbeth feels extreme guilt after committing such a “gross sin.” He felt so guilty to an extent where he couldn’t even pray anymore.  Ambition in itself is not bad. It is when ambition goes unchecked. That’s when it becomes a danger. If Mcbeath would have wanted to be king and rightfully fought for the crown, that’s one thing. But allowing his greed for power  to move him to murder is another.