Luckily explorations. She gave me what seemed like mountains

Luckily for me I’ve inherited much more than just the same eye color or similar shaped lips from my parents, I’ve acquired a curiosity and a passion for learning. My father, an electrical engineer, taught my siblings and I to explore the world with curious eyes, constantly seeking to learn more, not to just memorize material but to fully understand it. I  remember watching him for hours as he built a computer for my younger brother, questioning how the parts function and what all the various symbols and lines meant. I have always been fascinated by technology and wanted to know how and why things worked the way they did.”How does this projector work?” “What’s inside this stereo?” I was never satisfied with the overly simplified answers my parents would give me to these questions. So, I discovered many answers on my own by exploring.As a child I would spend hours messing around with circuit boards, computers, appliances. I would disassemble and tinker with these items, placed conveniently for me to fix (thanks mom and dad). My mother, noticed my insatiable curiosity and encouraged my explorations. She gave me what seemed like mountains at the time of mind-opening books. Books like “Do Cats Really Have Nine Lives?; And Other Questions About Your World” allowed me to discover the appeal of creative questions and their interesting answers.My parents provided me with plenty of opportunities to learn by trial and error. I remember when my parents bought a microwave when I was around 9 years old. As they were setting up the microwave, I saw the owner’s manual and began reading it. After reading the manual front-to-back, I learned how to use a feature called “child lock,” or what I thought was more fitting, “parent lock.” I could disable the microwave by pressing a special sequence of buttons, which would protect my parents from the dangers of using the microwave without my supervision. When I was 12, my parents bought a computer for $25 from a local thrift store with the intention of letting me loose on it. Motivated by curiosity, I began dissembling it at once and learned how everything worked. I learned how to use every feature on the computer’s operating system.My passion for learning new things is due to the early influences of my parents and childhood experiences which have fueled my curiosity inside and outside the classroom — learning from everything I do. I hope to continue applying this to all aspects of my life, exploring the world through the eyes of my childhood self. For $25 my parents allowed me to discover my passion for Computer Science and Software Engineering, igniting a fire inside me that has yet to burn out.