Lucy that fails to fit in, and struggles without

Lucy AronsonMr. CummingsCP 1019, January, 2018    Brave New World    “Brave New World” acquires its names from William Shakespeare’s “The Tempest”. Though written in 1931, “Brave New World” was based during AF 632 at the World State city of London. In this world, humans had been engineered through artificial wombs. Children had been given predetermined castes based on this society’s strict system. The castes Alpha and Beta luxuriate in superior tasks. Consequently, the castes Gamma, Delta, and Epsilon carry out degrading roles. In this culture, giving birth, and saying things like “mother, father, aging, and death” were frowned upon. Ten Controllers hold all the authority in this new world and tranquility was maintained by constraining infant minds and by subduing adults with the tranquilizer, SOMA. The motto for the World State is “Community, Identity, Stability”. The process by which these three qualities were perpetuated and attained seem completely contradictory in “Brave New World”.    Individuality is nearly nonviable. Moreover, seeing that this new world was built on a large foundation of identical, effortlessly gerrymandered people, the society endures to thrive. Though individuality may be extinct, stability fourlishes. “When the individual feels, society reels,” Lenina, a vaccination worker, reminds Bernard. Bernard is an alpha that fails to fit in, and  struggles without success for a bona fide human emotion. Henceforth, his inability is a catastrophic flaw in Bernard. Even love represents a peril to cohesion founded on uniformity.     In World State, sexual encounters were purposefully designed to hide feelings the citizens are missing, utilizing its expression in “Orgy-Porgy”. This organized release of sexual urges, advocates the population to perceive the joy of their society’s unity. John, the savage who is the child to the Director and Linda, has sensitive feelings about love on the account of his upbringing in the savage reservation. Occasionally, individuals experience negative effects of the struggle, their society will not prevent. SOMA is a drug that represents a way to escape any negative feelings and overcome them with positive ones. Therefore, the citizens were encouraged to take SOMA to eliminate the effects of conflict. After John’s own experience of “Orgy-Porgy”, he commits suicide.        Ultimatly, Bernard and John fight their society’s cotinuous efforts to take their individuality. Bernards objections continue, simply as a show of audacious and bravado, even after he receives the sexual and social attention. He ascertains no reason to fight for the righteousness of others oppressed by the social system. Correspondingly, John uses a vision of freedom that incorporates everyone to challenge the brave new world. His objection is not only his own absence of comfort, but the degradation of slavery inflicted by the society. Even with all its danger and pain, John’s acceptance of an independent human life represents an idealistic stand beyond Bernard’s conception or fearlessness. Imperfect, misguided, John nevertheless dares to claim his right to be a distinct individual. Subsequently, all the attempts to free the individual from the grasp of the World State have failed, demolished by the power of convention induced by hypnopaedia and multitude psychology. Only Helmholtz and Bernard, bound for exile in the Falkland Islands, render the possibility of a minimal hope — a restricted freedom within the confines of a inhibitory society.In the World State City of London, humans are engineered through artificial wombs and given predetermined castes. In this culture, giving birth, and saying things like “mother, father, aging, and death” were frowned upon and tranquility was maintained by constraining infant minds and by subduing adults with the tranquilizer, SOMA. Stability flourishes, but individuality is nearly nonviable. Bernard is an alpha that fails to fit in meets an abundance of people like him. People who think and feel differently than the rest of their society. All sexual relations are designed to blur the distinctions among lovers and between emotions and urges, in a ritual called “Orgy-Porgy”. John has sensitive feelings about love on the account of his upbringing in the savage reservation. Both Bernard and John fight against the society’s continual efforts to undermine their individuality. All attempts to free themselves failed. Bernard and Helmholtz, bound for exile at the Falkland Islands, and John who commits suicide after experiencing his own “Orgy-Porgy”. The individuals rights may be limited in the modern world, but they must be exercised constantly, or they are lost.