While body injuries,”.[3] Increasingly under an international spotlight, South

While
domestically, the apartheid South African government used deadly violence and
oppressive laws; internationally, it was armed with money used for persuasion
in an attempt to try to rescue its tarnished image. This international campaign
was known as the Muldergate scandal designated roughly $74 million to buy international
media influence, and $31 million to launch a pro-apartheid publication called the
Citizen.1
These attempts failed and international journalists were unpersuaded, and along
with the growing global antiapartheid movement, they exposed it. A media frenzy
was under way, with two key people in its view: Steve Biko, whose death in
custody sparked an avalanche of bad press for the South African government, and
Nelson Mandela, who remained imprisoned. While international media had already scrutinized
the South African government for its abuses, the death of Steve Biko created an
uproar of disdain towards the apartheid South African government. International
media greatly escalated calls for the resignation of President Paul Kruger with
a Washington Post editorial openly having asked: “Is there an
explanation other than a calculated official policy to physically destroy
substantial segments of the country’s black leadership, and in so doing to try
to intimidate others who would offer South Africa’s black majority alternatives
to tranquil acceptance of apartheid?”2 and CBS News having said Biko
suffered “multiple brain and body injuries,”.3 Increasingly under an
international spotlight, South Africa’s inaction generated more criticism.
“The still unexplained death … has more than ever put the South African
system … with its provisions for unlimited detention without trial or charges
… its apparent use of brutal assault and torture – on international
trial,” wrote The Washington Post.4 It detailed South Africa’s
torture techniques:

1 Rees, M and Day, C. Muldergate: The story of the info scandal.
Macmillan: Johannesburg, 1980.

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2 Kerney, J. Reagan. “A Death
in South Africa.” The Washington Post. September 15, 1977. https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/politics/1977/09/15/a-death-in-south-africa/4c7e61c1-6480-46eb-bc9e-350673f2c3e7/?utm_term=.914fddf5787e
(accessed December 2, 2017).

3 McHelheny, Victor K. “Arizona
Republic from Phoenix, Arizona on September 19, 1977 · Page 1.”
Newspapers.com. September 19, 1977. https://www.newspapers.com/newspage/119586767/
(accessed December 2, 2017).

4 Kerney, J. Reagan. “A Death
in South Africa.” The Washington Post. September 15, 1977. https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/politics/1977/09/15/a-death-in-south-africa/4c7e61c1-6480-46eb-bc9e-350673f2c3e7/?utm_term=.914fddf5787e
(accessed December 2, 2017).